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Showing posts from June, 2018

Dangers Of Using Mobile Phone While Driving

One cannot tell if it is the sense of being indispensable or an act of taking for granted what the worst could be while driving or riding and speaking on the mobile phone at the same time. Since the mobile phone became a necessity rather than a luxury, most people forget that like any other good device it can be a bad servant. There have been instances where passengers have had to draw the attention of drivers about driving and making phone calls. There was a disagreement between a passenger and a driver who was speaking on the mobile phone while he drove. The vehicle, a mini urvan bus was travelling from Nadowli to Wa. When the passenger drew the driver's attention to an eminent danger which his action posed, he got angry. And his excuse was that he had slowed down and so there was no danger posed. When the passenger further reminded him that his safety as well as that of the passengers was of utmost importance, the driver answered: “my safety is not your concern”. The man is not…

Rampant Road Accidents On Our Roads

Statistics indicate that road crashes from January to May this year claimed one thousand and eight lives which is more than ten percent over last year's figure. Are majority of Ghanaians aware that in the last five months the country lost that number of lives through road crashes? Does the ordinary driver and “bookman” at the various transport unions have an idea about this number of deaths? How about personnel of law enforcement agencies who receive money from drivers so as to turn a blind eye to issues of overloading of vehicles? There are more questions than answers. Knowledge of such information regarding road crashes has the tendency of changing the attitude of all citizens. It is sad that statistics on road accidents have been generated over the years and yet the same problems exist. It then brings to the fore how the media, the transport unions and vehicle owners, the National Road Safety Commission (NRSC) and the Police Motor Traffic and Transport Department (MTTD) have co…

Concerted Efforts To End Begging For Alms By Children

Although the World Day Against Child Labour is celebrated on June 12 every year, this year (2018) the International Labour Organisation, (ILO) is organising a joint campaign with the World Day for Safety and Health at Work which is celebrated on April 28 every year to create awareness and help end child labour in all forms as well as improve safety and health of young workers. Safety and health at work as well as child labour border on the human rights of young people across the globe. These two issues fall under Sustainable Development Goals Eight with a target which enjoins countries to take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern day slavery and human trafficking, secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms.

While the World focuses on the major aspects of child labour such as child slavery, prostitution and trafficking there is …

GHANA'S MEANDERING DEMOCRACY

“Where there is a will, there is a way.” If we are determined enough, we can find a way to achieve massive results for Ghana, our Motherland. Our leaders are not born as leaders; they are made leaders through hard efforts into Office. Which is the price we all pay to ensure that we achieve any goal that is worthwhile. 

Our democracy has constantly been abused by a failed system. Our reputation has been ruined by our technocrats and politicians. An entangled system that has been set up elusively and managed by some of the most corrupt elite in our society. Africa, we were meant to be together, but each country stands alone with failure, hardships, guilt and uncertainty. 

The human race was meant to make a better livelihood for the next generation. In the Western countries, every generation, salutes the ones that came before it. Unfortunately, on our African continent, every generation blames the one before it. 

The world has always been challenged by the survival of the fitters’ syndrome.…

Need To Reform Ghana Football Association

Following the public viewing of the documentary by Ace investigative journalist, Anas Aremayaw Anas, a number of issues have emerged calling for appropriate steps to prevent the recurrence of corrupt practices in football administration in the country. While many Ghanaians think that the GFA must be dissolved with immediate effect based on the fact that it receives public funding, others are of the view that the national football body cannot be dissolved since it is registered as a private entity. The truth of the matter is that we need to trigger a reform process that involves major stakeholders in the football fraternity. This reform will have certain implications. First of all, it will mean that immediate steps need to be taken to clean the mess and restore the image of the country as far as national and global football is concerned. Secondly, systems and structures must be put in place to establish transparency and good corporate governance at all levels. In view of this, the way …

Premiering Of #Number 12 By Anas Aremeyaw Anas

Former American President Theodore Roosevelt once said "a man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car but if he has university education, he may steal the whole railroad". This was indeed amplified yesterday in the investigative documentary by Ace Investigative Journalist, Anas Aremeyaw Anas which was premiered at the Accra International Conference Center. The highly anticipated documentary was done in partnership with some international media organisations including the British Broadcasting Corporation, BBC. The fact that the premiering of the video attracted one of the biggest crowds ever seen at the center in recent times speaks volumes. It showed the interest Ghanaians had in watching the film and their abhorrence of corruption. It also indicated their love for football. Needless to state, corruption is an enemy to development and good governance. There is no doubt the one and half hour documentary was well researched and camera work has improved tremen…

Major Mahama's Death; One Year On

Exactly a year ago, the heart of Ghana slept in pain, anguish and torment when the sad news echoed in the corners of the country about the gruesome murder of a great and promising soldier. He was allegedly mistaken for an armed robber on the 29th day of May, 2017 and cruelly sent to his ancestors by some callous residents of Denkyira Obuasi. He was said to be on an early morning jogging through the town from a military base. Major Mahama and his colleagues were charged by the State to help end illegal mining in the area. His death shocked the nation to the core. Many institutions and individuals such as the present and former Presidents, Chiefs, prominent members of society, Parliament, Civil Society Organizations and the Christian Council of Ghana had condemned the act, describing it as gruesome, barbaric, inhumane, cruel and evil.

But what lessons have we learnt a year after, as individuals and as a nation. Have we been able to adequately handle the menace of instant injustice? Many …

AU Within The Context Of Challenges Facing The African Continent

Having existed for years as a continental body, the African Union has not been able to achieve the continental unity it wishes to attain. When its predecessor, the OAU, was formed in 1963, little did its leaders anticipate the myriad of problems it was likely to face as a body. What was uppermost on their minds was the total and quick emancipation of African States that were still under the yoke of colonialism. Today, the problems facing the continent range from ethnic and cross border conflicts, refugee problems as well as pervasive hunger and starvation. Other problems are the scourge of AIDS and the incessant military incursion in governance. Hence, it came as no surprise when in 2002 the OAU was replaced by the African Union with a more focused goal of propelling African states towards peace and prosperity as the basis for achieving the ultimate goal of political and economic integration of its member states. A major challenge confronting the AU and its leaders is how to respond t…

Ensuring Environmental Cleanliness During This Rainy Season

By the dictates of nature, once again the rains are with us and the critical issue that comes to the fore is sanitation and waste management in the towns and cities. The proper disposal of waste generated in order to keep the environment clean to avoid the outbreak of communicable diseases such as malaria and cholera becomes critical. The fact is that for the past years sanitation and waste management have always been very challenging to the authorities in spite of the several efforts to keep the city clean. Over the years, successive governments have initiated policies to deal with sanitation to avoid the yearly recurrence of flooding and its inherent effects. However, it appears measures put in place have not been far reaching enough. The truth is that sanitation and waste management challenges which confront the country everyday are the direct results of the people's own activities. People carelessly throw rubbish about especially into drains and gutters at the least opportunit…

Ghana’s Inclusive Education Policy

Increasing access to education remains a vital tool for eradicating extreme poverty, improving quality of lives and growing economies. Yet, a large number of Ghanaian children face many barriers to education at the basic level, and therefore risk failing to achieve their educational goals. UNICEF estimates that nearly 500,000 children are out of school in Ghana. These children have never been to school or have dropped out of school because of a myriad of educational barriers. Learners with special educational needs, like children with learning difficulties constitute a large proportion of this out-of-school population. Projections from the 2010 Population and Housing Census indicate that about two percent of the entire population of school-going children aged between 6 and 14 years have some form of disability, of which 14 percent are out of school. Studies also show that about 20 percent of out-of-school children on the streets show symptoms of learning difficulties.

Aside this worryi…